SLINGSHOT Celero FR
Sizes Available: 5’6″ x 18 1/2″ x 2 1/4″ 23.75L, , 5’8″ x 18 1/2″ x 2 1/4″ 26L, 5’11” x 20 1/4″ x 2 3/8″ 32.4L
Sizes Tested: 5’8″ x 18 1/2″ x 2 1/4″ 26L

Slingshot Says:

The Celero FR is like your favorite pair of jeans — comfortable, reliable and versatile. They never go out of style, never let you down and you trust their performance no matter what conditions you encounter during the day. The Celero FR is the most popular board in our lineup, and for good reason. Its classic shortboard shape has a familiar feel for any surfer and provides a perfect blend of performance and versatility for riders of all shapes, sizes and skill level.

The Slingshot Celero FR features a stout body, curved outline and mild rocker that blends from the center to the tail. It’s a stable ride that planes easily and has good upwind and light wind performance. A modified winged thumb tail frees it up for a snappier feel during turns. Large carbon stringer patches on the top and bottom give the board strength where it’s needed while keeping overall weight down. Additional carbon on the tail prevents breakage from heel impact.

Visit for more info: www.slingshotsports.com/2019-Celero

Our Testers Say:

“Relatively wide outline, steps into the pin tail for good turning. Put your weight back for increased edge to edge turning and place your weight foward for stability and upwind ease. Overall construction is heavy, stiff and strong.” // Dray Murray

“Stable, easy to ride, nice profile in chop. Deck pad was really grippy. The Celero felt very stable in choppy conditions and has a striking design that makes it stand out from the crowd.” // Joe Chehock

Meet Our Testers

Tkb Says:

The Celero FR is Slingshot’s long heralded all around surfboard shape that testers found to be super stable and easy to ride. With a straighter rocker and a single concave bottom though the entire board, this board defiantly blazes upwind and tracks really well. Testers commented on the Celero’s stability — it seems really comfortable locked into a straight line, and seems to have a rail that lends to bigger drawn out carving lines. The winged thumb tail makes the board much more responsive when you stomp on the pin tail, making the Celero very responsive to inputs. Testers noticed how the tail pad extends all the way back, with the raised kick located in the narrow part of the pin tail. This narrower kick stop didn’t have as much grip for our foot, so we paid a bit more attention to foot placement in strapless freestyle. The Celero’s thruster fin setup has a bit more of a locked in feel rather than loose and skatey; the Celero’s grip during turns is solid and confidence inspiring, but hard to break loose. The Celero would seem to shine during heavy bottom turns where you would need full control and confidence in the rail and fins through the entire line. As testers noted, the Celero is really friendly pounding through chop making it a great freeride board for those looking for comfort and stability. The tail is narrow enough that when you stomp on it the Celero turns really well, making it a fun performer in windswell to medium-sized surf. Construction feels pretty tough and durable with the weight coming in a little bit heavier. That weight may make strapless freestyle require a bit more technique, but you know you can throw hard landings on this board and it will take it. Weight is often a plus in the waves — think tow-boards where the extra inertia smooths out the chop and gives you a bit more control over the board. Overall, testers gave the Celero FR props for its user-friendly chop handling and stability, with solid marks as a performer in small to large size waves.

The Celero FR came with a two-piece deck pad that covers ¾ of the board. There are five insert positions to dial in the perfect forward and aft position, all mounted down the center with no duck options. The deckpad’s diamond pattern got solid reviews for its extra grippy texture and solid balance between comfort and density for input into the board. We noted the kick stop is a bit narrow and located all the way in the tail, but with a bit of adjustment it did the trick.


With the help of 14 testers from all walks of kiteboarding, Tkb’s staff assembled detailed gear reviews with objective performance criteria of the latest 2019 kites, twin tips and foilboards all packed into one neat and tidy 180-page digital package. Get all the reviews in convenient digital guide here: https://www.thekiteboarder.com/product/2019-freeride-gear-review-guide/