Sizes Available: 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 21m
Sizes Tested: 8, 10, 12m

Flysurfer Says:

The Soul combines high comfort with a sporty character. The inspiring technical lightweight kite construction, the highest safety standards and precise control and bar feedback. The great water relaunch and improved drainage system bring it all together to make the Soul truly user friendly. Experience a new way of kiting!

The Soul gives you a sublime hydrofoil experience by using short flying lines (from 12-17m, depending on the size), to allow for the fastest maneuvers. This setup enables a more direct feel of the kite and generates less lift, which is perfect for learning a new aspect of the kitesport and adds safety whilst teaching on land or snow. The new bridle check can be done by measuring and comparing the black marked lines at the canopy to compensate stretch or shrink of the bridle. The SOUL combines all benefits of a foilkite with the same methodical relaunch of a LEI-Kite to make exercises as simple as possible.

Visit for more info: www.flysurfer.com/project/soul

Our Testers Say:

“The Soul took my foil kite virginity — with its gentle non-intimidating controls and easy water relaunches, I couldn’t ask for a better first foil kite time. Super stable, low bar pressure, slower turning speed but excellent relaunch.” // Tib Anghel

“Huge wind range, with crazy grunt and loads of depower, the Soul has the range of 2-3 sizes of LEI kites. Lots of lift for massive boosts and the hangtime is incredible. Slow arcing turns makes big air very comfortable and easy to time. Very intuitive for an inflatable kiter to use and with great upwind angle of attack.” // Dray Murray

“Relaxing kite, very little bar pressure and very floaty while still turning fairly quickly for a foil. Couldn’t always feel where the kite was in the window, but felt like a luxury vehicle with gentle bar pressure and a nice cruisy ride, gentle but fun.” // Bryan Waldberg

Meet Our Testers

TKB Says:

The Flysurfer Soul was the only freeride-oriented foil/ram air kite in this year’s freeride gear test. Flysurfer is a longstanding foil kite manufacturer based out of Germany that has its roots in paragliding. While most people associate foil/ram air kites with racing, Flysurfer has been making ram air kites geared toward the average freeride kiter for many years and the Soul represents the culmination of that experience along with recent developments in paragliding and kite racing technology. The big sell with foil kite technology is greater efficiency that delivers more power per square inch and better upwind performance, while the downside tends to be slower turning response and non-linear bar response and power delivery. The Soul belongs to that class of kite that attempts to bridge the gap between foil efficiency and inflatable steering performance and ease of use.

The first thing we noticed with the Soul is that launching is significantly easier than the high-performance foil race kites we’ve tested in recent years. Typically, you pre-inflate the main part of the kite and then launch with the tips folded over or ‘dog eared.’ During this launch process the Soul felt more stable and controllable before the wingtips fully inflated. Some foils you have to stall and then accelerate the kite to get the wingtips to unfold, but the Soul seemed to inflate its wingtips in a gradual but dependable process. The steering on the Soul is quite good compared to race foils with the turning response more direct and the turning seemingly quicker than its race-oriented brethren. The steering took a little adjustment compared to the freeride inflatables we tested, but we did notice that in urgent situations (kite headed for water) we could grab extra tension on the leader lines and the kite would turn in a complete pivot — this saved us from dumping the foil in the water more than a couple of times. Although this kite flies farther forward in the window compared to other freeride kites, it is an ultra-stable kite that never flew over our head. The Soul likes to be moving across the window rather than sitting deep and drifting. The Soul has a little more sheet and go feel than other race wings, but ultimately the bulk of the power comes from flying this kite actively, and by building up some apparent wind. In terms of relaunch, we dumped this kite in the water a number of times, rolled it over itself and every time it stayed inflated and relaunched without problem. To say that a sleeping bag is just as reliable as our freeride inflatables seems far-fetched but we were incredibly impressed with how this kite relaunched from the water, time and time again. Testers notice that it took quite a bit of time to deflate the kite at the end of a session (with the deflate flaps open, of course) but this is the flip side of building a ram air kite that holds it shape when you crash it in the water; this slow deflate is precisely what gives you a bigger relaunch window. Apparently the Soul’s baffles are designed on purpose to be better at keeping air in rather than letting it out, and as a result, packing up takes a little bit more work. When it came to jumping, the efficiency of the Soul become apparent in both lift and hangtime, although the steering dynamics and timing on sending the kite for big air takes a bit to get used to. In terms of construction, the Soul uses two different canopy materials; a thicker ripstop on the nose for greater durability and a lighter version in the canopy. The bridles feature the typical complexity you get with ram air kites and by following recommendations to keep the bar connected to the kite when not in use, it made things relatively simple to keep things clean. Overall, the Soul is a very compelling reason to cross into the ram air realm for a high performing freeride kite. For those that are foilboarding, cruising big distances and boosting big air, the Soul is an excellent ram air option that combines user-friendly and high-performance efficiency in the same package.

The Soul came with the Infinity 3.0 Airstyle CC Bar which is a dual adjustable length bar (50/60cm) with a single centerline safety flag depower and a double spectra trim/throw line that splits through the bar’s aluminum insert to integrate an auto-rotating swivel. The safety system uses a simple push away quick release with below the bar auto swivel, safety travel guard, and center routed safety depower and donkey stick. The center routed safety line runs up through the center a good ways and attaches to one of the center lines for a complete flag (note that the extra length of this safety line is designed to get a full flag on even the largest sized kites). The bar’s power tuning uses a Clam Cleat that allows for adjustable length throw and the tuning toggle has Velcro that allows the excess slack in the power tuning line to attach to the cleat to keep things clean. All bar lines end in loops that larkhead around small stainless rings on the kite’s bridle. Changing the length of the bar is incredibly easy by simply sliding the floats up and changing the knot to the inboard or outboard end of the bar. There are three knots for adjusting the length of the outside line lengths – just requires sliding up the foam floats and moving the bar’s slip knot onto the desired setting (stock is the shortest knot). The color coding on the bar is subtle; the left (port) is signaled by red leader lines and the right side of the grip is green (starboard). The bar grip features a fairly dense UVA grip with some good texture and the smaller sized bar ends are hard plastic and feature separate foam floats. The overall bar weight is light to medium and the balance of options and streamlined designed makes this a straightforward but rich control system with functional features.

Visit for more info on the bar: www.flysurfer.com/project/infinity-3-0-airstyle-cc-bar


With the help of 14 testers from all walks of kiteboarding, Tkb’s staff assembled detailed gear reviews with objective performance criteria of the latest 2019 kites, twin tips and foilboards all packed into one neat and tidy 180-page digital package. Get all the reviews in convenient digital guide here: https://www.thekiteboarder.com/product/2019-freeride-gear-review-guide/