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Slingshot 2010 Skud Skimboard Analyze This Board Review

Slingshot 2010 Skud Skimboard Analyze This Board Review

TESTED: 55”
AVAILABLE SIZES: 52” and 55”
FINS: One 2.5” Removable Fin
TESTED IN: San Diego, 8 to 16m conditions and medium to huge surf

FROM THE MANUFACTURER

For those looking for fun options and variation in light wind kiteboarding, Slingshot brings you the all new 2010 Scud skim style kiteboard as the latest addition to the Lightwind Collection. The Scud skim style board is a great addition to any quiver for an intermediate to advanced rider looking to maximize their time in marginal conditions. Features such as the custom shape, removable fin, skim style front and rear pads, and Slingshot’s proprietary FRT core construction make the Scud an effortless decision for light wind riding.

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THE KITEBOARDER REPORT

Out of the Box: The Slingshot Scud arrived at our test center in Corpus Christi only to find no wind, so off to California it went. At first glance, the Scud looks similar to a standard skim board, with the addition of a 2.5” center fin on the tail. The Scud has very little rocker (almost all of the rocker is in the nose), very hard rails, and a moderately wide pin tail. Our test board did not come with traction pads, but future boards will ship with skim-style pads. We simply waxed up the deck and headed to the beach.

On the Water : We were very surprised (and initially frustrated) when we first rode this board, only to repeatedly fall down like we just learned to ride. The Scud is a skim board, and it rides like one. Even with the center fin, the Scud is loose. If you try to ride this board like you would ride a twin tip or surfboard, be prepared to slide around all over the place. However, once you begin to figure out how to properly ride the Scud, a whole world opens up. The Scud feels much like a skateboard. After initially struggling on the Scud, we were going for shove-its and strapless airs.

The looseness of the board is very forgiving for skate-style tricks and the moderately wide tail offers a lot of pop. Even with the fin installed, the board can be ridden backwards as long as you put a lot of your weight on your back foot. The Scud’s flat rocker and wide outline kept us going and having fun when the wind began to die. We had fun on the Scud, but also fell down a lot.

PROS:

  • This is a very fun and unique board to add to your quiver. It offers a very different ride compared to surfboards and twin tips.
  • The light wind abilities will keep you having fun when other riders are slogging.

CONS:

  • The Scud takes some time to learn how to ride. You will fall down a lot for your first few sessions on this board.
  • This is not a replacement for a surfboard, but a totally different ride. If you aren’t willing to spend time learning how to ride this board, you will not enjoy it.

THE VERDICT: The Scud isn’t going to be for everyone, but if you are willing to spend a little time learning how to ride it, it’s an absolute blast. Its light-wind abilities will keep you going when other riders cannot.

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